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Definition of Taekwon-Do

TAEKWON-DO…….A way of life.

What exactly is the meaning of Taekwon-Do?

Literally translated means:

Tae: Jumping or flying, to kick or smash with the foot.

Kwon: Denotes the fist, chiefly to punch or destroy with the hand or fist.

Do: The art or the way.

Taken collectively “Taekwon-Do” indicates the mental training and the techniques of unarmed combat for self-defense as well as health, inolving the skilled applicatin of punches, kicks, blocks and dodges with bare hands and feet to the rapid destruction of the moving opponent or opponents.

To put it simply Taekwon-do is a version of unarmed combat designed for the purpose of self-defence.  However, it is more than just that.

It is the scientific use of the body in the method of self-defense; a body that has gained the ultimate use of its facilities through intensive physical and mental training.

It is a martial art that has no equal in either power or technique.  Though it is a martial art, its discipline, technique and mental training are the mortar for building a strong sense of justice, fortitude, humility and resolve.  It is this mental conditioning that separates the true practitioner from the sensationalist, content with mastering only the fighting aspects of the art.

This is one of the reasons that Taekwon-Do is called an art of self-defense.  It also implies a way of thinking and life, particularly in instilling a concept and spirit of strict self-imposed discipline and an ideal of noble moral rearmament.

Taekwon-Do definitely enables the weak to possess a fine weapon together with a confidence to defend him or herself and defeat the opponent as well.

Of course, wrongly applied, Taekwon-Do can be a lethal weapon.  Therefore mental training must always be stressed to prevent the student from misusing it.

As for women, they will undoubtedly find Taekwon-do an invaluable asset in tackling and driving away “wolves,” so to speak.  When one is informed of the many instances where women effectively protected themselves, they may sound unbelievable.  But really, they have been able to do so because they are well versed in the art of self-defense.

The feats of Taekwon-Do are great in number.  To mention a few is probably pertinent: For instance, flying over a mounted motorcycle or eleven persons in line to attack a target with the foot; breaking an inch thick pine board placed at a height of ten or eleven feet with the foot; breaking two pieces of red brick with an open hand or knife-hand; smashing seven or eight pieces of two inch thick pine board with a single blow with the fist; attacking two targets with the same foot in succession while flying and so on.  To the layman in the street, such feats may sound impossible, but to the serious students of Taekwon-Do and the exponents of this art, it is quite ordinary.  Of course, by mastering this art it does not mean that you will be asked to do acts of impossibility.